Post Corning, Post Colorado, Post GLASS.

This has been a summer to beat all summers.  Just returned from Colorado (no mountain lion sightings or mine break-ins, sadly) a lot of rocks climbed, rivers rafted, and friends enjoyed.  And the cute Fiat rental.  Not so fab on those mountain passes, but cute as a button and speedy in the city.  One small and unexpected highlight from our last day in Denver- the Clyfford Still Museum was wonderful- both the art, archive excerpts and the building itself.  Very thoughtfully done.  Above is a picture of my partner in crime in front of the highly textured facade of the Clyfford Still Museum and the Cutest Fiat in the World.

A few days before we left for The West, I returned from The Studio at Corning Glass and my class with the Higuchis.  My classmates were wonderful and the program at Corning was really smart and artist-centered.  I loved that there was so much of an eye towards personal research- The Rakow Library and Corning Museum of Glass seemed very welcoming to the studio artists, and the museum/studio gave lectures on their collections, lectures on photographing your work, critiques and a photography session to shoot your glass.  Workshop Instructors and TA’s presented their work, but students were also encouraged to present- it was really impressive to see the talent in the room, as well as to recognize some of the work from my intense reconnaissance mission on Glass this year!  As I had suspected, most of the work of the younger academic types was less technique driven, and more content driven- more “Post-Studio Glass” or “Glass Secessionist” as I have heard these terms recently (well, I’ve only been in this for 11 months) bandied about.  I don’t yet know if these are terms that people agree on or share- much like a lot of work I would call “feminist” still has the artist in question cringing/denying, much to my dismay.  Above, my two “Higuchi-style” Pate de Verre bowls- my “Arachne atop Doilie” bowl and “Dead Blue Bird and Buttons” bowl.

My mother and her friend (both savvy, artsy ladies) came up to visit at the end of my course and hadprepared themselves by attending a day long seminar on glass at the Smithsonian, presented by an education curator from Corning!  Apparently (my mom just shared this with me from her “archive”) my mother had written her senior h.s. paper (all twenty five pages of typewritten greatness) on the “Evolution of Modern Glassware” which extensively covered all that I learned in my perusing of the museum’s collection. She still knows waaaay more than I do about my new obsession, but then she is a librarian and she does work in the National Gallery of Art’s library. Smart Cookie, that one.

I also just de-installed my two person show “Parallels” at the Art Academy of Cincinnati.  I was very excited to see my new direction of glass and video come together in a way that I was quite happy with.  I created a wall section of a damask “soot wallpaper” which collumned up from a shelf with a cast glass hand mirror, through which one can see a video of a forest fire.  It is entitled “Will You Miss Me When I Burn”.   I’m looking forward to following this incendiary trail in a variety of ways.  Thanks to Jane Durrell for the plug on Melanie Hart’s and my show at the Art Academy of Cincinnati:

I have lots left to do this summer: taking a glass blowing course, trying out my Japanese plaster, making new-successful-molds, test-tiles, and hopefully playing with some new ideas that I have for my work, and getting some show dates and funding to help with it all.  And driving my hot, old car another year to pay for my studio expenses that I chronically over-indulge in.  Art Patron, O Art Patron, Where for Art Thou?

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